Easter 2

Dear Friends,

For some people Monday is being regarded as “the glorious 12th”, with the easing of some of the lockdown restrictions, and “non-essential” shops reopening, as well as hairdressers and other establishments; and outdoor service restarting in pubs, restaurants and cafes.

For many people this will come as a welcome end to some of the restrictions we have been enduring over past months, but the Government is rightly urging us all to maintain social distancing, mask-wearing and hand-washing, in order to limit the numbers of infections which are likely to follow as more people are out and about and mixing more freely.

For others, this will be an anxious time and it will take time to build confidence about starting to go about daily life outside the confines of home once again. For those who have been shielding, this will be especially challenging and I ask your prayers for those known to us in our church family to whom this applies.

Monday will also be the funeral of Tony Steele, much-loved member of Good Shepherd congregation, and also known and loved by many people at Godshill. His funeral will be conducted by Anne Davis, at Good Shepherd church at 10.30, followed by burial at Bridgecourt Cemetery.

Please pray for the repose of Tony’s soul, and remember Janet and all the family at the sad time.

Last week, the funeral of Sue Goff’s mother, Doreen, took place at St Alban’s, followed by burial at Ventnor cemetery. Please pray for the repose of Doreen’s soul, and remember Sue and all her family, as they mourn Doreen’s loss.

Although death of course brings such sadness, as we remember those whom we will no longer see again in this life, we can take comfort from the message of Easter; that through his life, death and resurrection Christ conquered death and opened the way for us to everlasting life.

This won’t stop us feeling sad, but we can mourn our loved-ones in the knowledge that death does not have the final word. Jesus’ resurrection shows us that our earthly death is, in fact, the gateway to eternal life with him; and so we can rightly sing, ”Thine be the glory”, with tears pouring down our faces.

All Saints’ will be open daily for private prayer from Wednesday 14th.

Christ is risen, alleluia, alleluia! He is risen indeed, alleluia, alleluia!

With my love and prayers,

Deacon Corinne

Scripture Readings

Easter-2-Readings

(Download the Scripture Readings)

Reflection

Easter-2-Reflection

(Download the Reflection)

The image is the beginning of the Gospel of St John in the “Coronation Gospels” (Cotton MS. Tiberius A. II, f. 162r). The manuscript was damaged by fire in 1731, the parchment leaves subsequently being mounted in paper frames. It is to be found in the British Library. Creative Commons CC0 License

Easter Sunday

Dear Friends,

Happy Easter! It is such a joy that we can be back in church again for the great annual celebration of the Resurrection of Our Lord; and we owe a debt gratitude to the priests who will be presiding and preaching in our churches. We also give thanks and pray for our churchwardens, Dennis and Alan, and other church officers, as they continue to keep our churches running smoothly.

There will be mass next Sunday April 11th at both St Alban’s and All Saints, at 9.30 and 11.00 respectively, with Fr Gregory Clifton-Smith presiding and preaching.

At the Chrism mass on Maundy Thursday last week, when this year clergy and accredited lay ministers had the opportunity to renew their commitment to ministry, this year via live-stream, the Bishop said this to his Deacons,

“At your ordination as a deacon
you received the yoke of Christ,
who came not to be served but to serve. Will you continue faithfully in this ministry, to build up God’s people in his truth
and serve them in his name?”

Our response was, “With the help of God, I will”.

As I have renewed our commitment to ministry and dedicated myself afresh to living out my calling as I serve the churches of our constituency, I ask your prayers to help me to do this, as I will pray for you; especially as we continue in our vacancy and start to work more collaboratively with other churches.

However, the call to ministry is not just about clergy! It is a calling for the whole people of God and starts at our baptism, as each and every one of us is called into ministry and discipleship, and to participate in the missional life of God according to our gifts and circumstances, whether we have a particular designated “role” in the church or not.

By virtue of our baptism, God places his mark on us to be co-workers with Him in building of the Kingdom of God in our daily lives, in our relationships one with another, in the values we hold and the choices we make about how we live.

It is therefore a duty and a privilege for each one of us prayerfully to consider the vocation of our churches and how we can respond to the challenge to grow in impact, depth and number, so that the Good News of the Gospel of Christ can be made a reality in the communities in which we are set.

With my love and prayers,

Deacon Corinne

Scripture Readings

Easter-Sunday-Readings

(Download the Scripture Readings)

Reflection

Easter-Sunday-Reflection

(Download the Reflection)

The image is a print from the Phillip Medhurst Collection of Bible illustrations in the possession of Revd. Philip De Vere at St. George’s Court, Kidderminster, dated January 1 1970 Creative Commons CC0 License

Palm Sunday

Dear Friends,

Palm Sunday marks the beginning of Holy Week, so I hope you will be able to find some time to consider the themes which are uppermost at this time.

Holy week is a time for us to reflect on Jesus’ journey to the Cross, beginning with his triumphal entry into Jerusalem and concluding with his lonely trek from the Upper Room through Gethsemane and ultimately to Calvary and the empty tomb.

Maundy Thursday (from mandatum, ‘commandment’, because of the use of John 13.34 in the Antiphon) contains a rich complex of themes: humble Christian service expressed through Christ’s washing of his disciples’ feet, the institution of the Eucharist, the perfection of Christ’s loving obedience through the agony of Gethsemane.

Thursday passes into Good Friday, recalling the death of the Son of God. What other response can we have than other than silence in the face of a sense of desolation. But within the silence there grows a sense of peace and completion, and then the rising excitement as the Easter Vigil on Holy Saturday and the glories of Easter Day draw near.

All Saints’ will be open for private prayer from 10.00 on Palm Sunday; and I have left a sheet with readings for the day and a reflection on the gospel, written by Allan Procter, Reader emeritus at St Saviour’s. There will also be palm crosses available for you to take away.

Please will you remember Ted and Jackie Holden in your prayers? Ted has been diagnosed recently with a leaky heart valve and pneumonia. He was in hospital last week being treated for the pneumonia and, happily he’s been responding to treatment for that. He is now home and will be building up his strength in order to have a heart operation in due course.

Please also remember Tony Steel and all the Steele family in your prayers. Tony’s funeral will be at Good Shepherd at 12.00 on April 12th, followed by burial at Bridgecourt Cemetery.

Please pray, too, for the repose of the soul of Doreen Castle, Sue Goff’s mum, and for Sue as she mourns her loss. Doreen died recently and her funeral will be at St Alban’s at 11.45 on April 9th.

Dennis will be opening All Saints’ every day from 10.00 during Holy week, except Saturday, when the church will be closed for cleaning, so please drop in for a time of quiet reflection and to light candles.

It will be wonderful to be together again on Easter Day for a Parish mass at All Saints’ at 11.00, with Alan Swanborough presiding and preaching. He will also baptise Albert Squibb during the mass, so please pray for Albert and his parents, Charlotte and Jack.

On April 11th, there will be mass at St Alban’s at 9.30 and at All Saints’ at 11.00, with Fr Gregory Clifton-Smith presiding and preaching.

With my love and prayers,

Deacon Corinne

Scripture Readings

Palm-Sunday-Readings

(Download the Scripture Readings)

Reflection

Palm-Sunday-Reflection

(Download the Reflection)

The image is from the Cappella Palatina and is the work of the Master of the Palace Chapel in Palermo dating from around 1150 Creative Commons CC0 License

4th Sunday of Lent – Mothering Sunday

Dear Friends,

Next week we have two important saints to remember! On Wednesday it will be the Feast of St Patrick, Patron saint of Ireland; and on Friday 19th it will be the solemnity of St Joseph, husband of the Blessed Virgin Mary.

St Patrick was born in Roman Britain around the end of the 4th Century, and died in Ireland about the middle of the 5th century. As a missionary bishop, he endured many hardships and faced opposition even from his friends and fellow Christians. Nevertheless, he worked hard to conciliate, to evangelize, and to educate local chieftains and their families. He is remembered for his simplicity and pastoral care, for his humble trust in God, and for his fearless preaching of the gospel to the very people who had enslaved him in his youth.

We pray for Ireland, its leaders and people. For the Church in Ireland and its ongoing ministry of reconciliation and the leaders of the Protestant and Catholic churches. We give thanks and pray for all missionaries and those who teach the faith.

Nothing is known about St Joseph except what is said of him in the Gospels. He was a carpenter; he accepted the will of God; and he supported Mary and brought up Jesus. From the human character of his son we can see that he must have been a good and responsible father. He is widely venerated as a patron of artisans who use their God-given gifts honourably, and of workers in general.

We pray for all carpenters and craftsmen, especially any known to us. For all who exercise the role of adoptive parent, whether formally or informally.

Just a reminder that All Saints’ will be open for private from 10am on Sunday 14th, (Mothering Sunday) and again on Sunday 28th (Palm Sunday). All Saints’ will then be open daily for private prayer from 10.00 throughout Holy week.

We will be back in church on Easter Day, April 4th, with Fr Alan Swanborough presiding and preaching at a Parish mass at All Saints’ at 11.00. During this mass, the Sacrament of Baptism will be conferred on Albert Jack Peter Squibb. Please pray for him and his parents, Charlotte and Jack, and all Albert’s family.

The following Sunday, April 11th, there will be a mass at St Alban’s at 9.30 and one at All Saints’ at 11.0, at which Gregory Clifton-Smith will be presiding and preaching.

With my love and prayers,

Deacon Corinne

Scripture Readings

4th-Sunday-of-Lent-Readings

(Download the Scripture Readings)

Reflection

4th-Sunday-of-Lent-Reflection

(Download the Reflection)

This enamelled terracotta of the Madonna with Child, the Holy Spirit and two cherubims, is to be found in the Louvre in Paris. It is from the workshop of the Della Robbia and dates back to the early 16th century Creative Commons CC0 License

3rd Sunday of Lent

Dear Friends,

It is so good that from Monday 8th, it will be possible to meet with one person outside again.

For those who are shielding, of course, this will continue to the end of the month, but it does seem as though we are at last beginning to see the light at the end of the tunnel.

We had some sad news this past week, which is that Tony Steel sadly died on Sunday February 28th in St Mary’s Hospital. He had had a fall at home and then, unfortunately, contracted pneumonia and sepsis. Tony and Janet have been well known to All Saint’s, as well as to Good Shepherd church, over many years and he will be very much missed.

We don’t have a date for his funeral yet, which will be held at Good Shepherd, but please keep Tony, Janet and all the family in your prayers.

Thank you to all who have contributed their thoughts to our church reps about the skills you wish to see in the next Bishop of Portsmouth. The reps will be meeting with the Area Dean to feed back your suggestions to the Vacancy in See Committee, so that a Diocesan Profile can be drawn up.

Please pray for all involved in this process, that the right person will be called to serve the Diocese of Portsmouth as its Bishop, at this crucial time in the history of the Church in general and in the Diocese in particular.

Next Sunday, March 14th will be Mothering Sunday. Dennis will open All Saints’ on that day for private prayer from 10.00; and then from Palm Sunday, March 28th, the church will be open daily throughout Holy Week from 10.00 for private prayer, with resources available for people to use.

Fr Alan will preside and preach at a Parish mass at All Saint’s on Easter Day; and the following week, April 11th, Fr Gregory-Clifton Smith will preside and preach at St Alban’s at 9.30, followed by mass at All Saints’.

This will, hopefully, re-establish our pattern of masses on 2nd and 4th Sundays. St Alban’s will have a mass on 2nd Sundays, and it is hoped to be able to re-establish the monthly Communion service at St Margaret’s Hall in due course.

With my love and prayers,

Deacon Corinne

Scripture Readings

3rd-Sunday-of-Lent-Readings

(Download the Scripture Readings)

Reflection

3rd-Sunday-of-Lent-Reflection

(Download the Reflection)

The painting above is Christ driving the money-changers from the Temple by Cecco del Caravaggio (1589–1620) and is dated 1610. It is to be found in the Gemäldegalerie in Berlin. Creative Commons CC0 License

2nd Sunday of Lent

Dear friends,

The main Feast coming up next week is on Monday, which is St David’s day.

St David, or Dewi, was a saint who lived in Pembrokeshire, on the south-western tip of Wales. He was born into a noble family and was educated at Hen Fynyw, before studying to become a priest.

He founded 12 monasteries, including Menevia, which is known today as St David’s, and Glastonbbury.

David settled at Menevia, where the monks lived in extreme hardship, following the example of those in Egypt. They tilled the land by hand plough, were only allowed to speak when necessary, and ate only bread, vegetables and salt. David’s nickname was Aquaticus, because he and his monks only drank water.

David is remembered for his preaching and teaching. His last words are said to have been, “Brethren, persevere in the things you have heard from me”.

In your prayers, please remember the Church in Wales, all religious communities and all those who preach and teach the faith.

At our Society clergy zoom meeting with +Norman recently he told us that, although there won’t be a Society Chrism mass in a cathedral this year, and our clergy will be reaffirming their vows via Zoom on Maundy Thursday morning, the plan is for us to have a Society Chrism mass in Winchester in 2022. It is hoped that a good number of people from the island will attend, as by then we will have two Society clergy serving here – Tony Lawrence and me!

+Norman is still intending to come to the island once we are back into a regular rhythm of public worship. He hopes to use that as an opportunity for us to receive our oils, and for lay people to reaffirm their baptismal vows.

From next Sunday, the Sunday readings will be taken from the Common Worship Lectionary, instead of the Roman one. This will take us into line with the Church of England as a whole and, once we are back in church, will make life a lot easier for visiting clergy.

I hope you are finding a way to make Lent an enriching time for you. If you’ve not been able to decide on a Lent book, you could try reflectively reading one of the Gospels and listen for what new things God might be wanting to say to you, as you read the familiar passages with new eyes.

With my love and prayers,

Deacon Corinne

Scripture Readings

2nd-Sunday-of-Lent-Readings

(Download the Scripture Readings)

Reflection

2nd-Sunday-of-Lent-Reflection

(Download the Reflection)

The painting above is Transfiguration, by Raphael, which was unfinished at his death in 1520. It is part of the Pinacoteca Vaticana Collection in Vatican City. Creative Commons CC0 License

1st Sunday of Lent

1st Sunday of Lent

Dear friends,

At Deanery Synod last week, it was confirmed that Godshill Parish will now be part of the new grouping of churches in the South of the island, so that we can support one another in mission and encourage our churches to grow in depth, impact and number.

The Area Dean also mentioned that, although the 3 Society Parishes will be in different groupings, it is expected that they could still come together from time to time. +Norman has expressed his willingness to come to the island once lockdown is lifted, so it may be possible to do something jointly then.

We are not the only churches who will have an informal link across geographical partnerships with others of similar churchmanship, as a connection is being established between Mark Williams and his evangelical churches in Shanklin and Sandown and the people of St Paul’s Barton.

It is my hope that with an Anglo-Catholic presence in two different church partnerships on the island, this will give an opportunity for us to raise the profile of the richness of our tradition, and to demonstrate what we have to offer to the island and the Diocese as a whole. As +Norman said, we need to find our “value-added”!

Although we are, of course still in lockdown, and we will have to wait until that is lifted before we can meet to hold a PCC meeting face to face, please do start to have a think about what the strengths of our churches are. Dennis Owen, Alan Philpott or I would be very happy to hear about any ideas you might have about steps we could take to make the Diocesan Live Pray Serve mission strategy a reality in our churches.

I am very pleased to confirm that, once we are able to resume Public Worship, Fr Gregory will be able to restart his commitment to preside for us on 2nd Sundays in the month, starting on April 11th, travelling between St Alban’s and All Saints’ as before.

It remains to be seen when it will be possible for Messy Church to be able to start up again but, when it does, this will continue to be part of St Alban’s missional outreach into Upper Ventnor.

I do hope you have a blessed and rewarding Lent. I will continue to provide resources as we go through; and it is my hope that it will be possible to have a Parish mass at All Saints’ on Easter Day.

With my love and prayers,

Deacon Corinne

Scripture Readings

1st-Sunday-of-Lent-Readings

(Download the Scripture Readings)

Reflection

1st-Sunday-of-Lent-Reflection

(Download the Reflection)

The painting above is The Temptation of Christ by Juan de Flandes (1450–1519) painted circa 1500 and can be seen in the National Gallery of Art, Washington DC. Creative Commons CC0 License

6th Sunday in Ordinary Time

Dear friends,

At our clergy Chapter meeting on Feb 9th, the Area Dean shared with us the results of the comments she has had from the churches across the island about the Deanery Plan, and the consequent decisions she has made about the new groupings into which the various churches will be placed.

These decisions are not set in stone, but are based on feedback from members of our congregations about their wishes. If you don’t agree with the decision she has reached with regard to Godshill Parish, please contact her via your Deanery rep, Alan Philpott at: iowtv@hotmail.com

Amanda stressed that she is trying to avoid Pastoral reorganisation, as this can be such a painful process, fraught with difficulties and is likely to involve forced redundancies of sitting clergy. By drawing churches into partnerships, however, current Parish structures will remain as they are. The intention is that through these partnerships the churches can support one another in their mission, reduce duplication of services and be better placed to respond to the Bishops’ call to the churches to grow in depth, impact and number.

She also shared with us where it will be possible for her to make savings. The Deanery Plan will be presented at our Synod next week, before it goes to the Bishop for final approval.

Amanda stressed that, although she is very grateful to those churches who have paid their share in full, the fact remains that the Diocese only collected 56% of the expected total last year. Monies collected go into a central pot and, for churches in a vacancy, the decision to recruit (or not) to a post lies with need, rather than the individual churches ability to pay their share.

The good news for the 3 Society Parishes is that they will be protected, and an appointment will (in due course) be made for a Society priest who will serve across all 4 churches in our constituency; and I will continue to receive a half-stipend to carry on serving across the four churches for at least another year.

With regard to the grouping into which Godshill Parish will be put, Amanda took account of the differences of opinion expressed by our congregants about where we should “sit” in relation to the partnerships which she has been drawing up.

Whilst there were some who wanted to link with Ventnor and the other churches which will now be added to that group (St Lawrence, Whitwell, Niton and Chale), there were also strong voices rejecting the idea of Godshill Parish being included in any Ventnor grouping. Some people also expressed a strong desire for Godshill Parish to be in the same “hub” or “Partnership” as the other Society churches.

In light of all this, Amanda has decided that Godshill Parish should be put in the same group as Good Shepherd and St Saviour’s. As these churches have already agreed to join in Partnership with the other churches in the Bay, Amanda told us that Godshill Parish will therefore, along with Good Shepherd and St Saviour’s, join the Partnership with St Blasius, Shanklin; St Paul’s, Shanklin; Christchurch, Sandown; and St John’s, Sandown.

The Bay clergy have now met several times and have been exploring some potentially exciting mission opportunities; and the PCCs for Good Shepherd and St Saviour’s are also very much on board with these plans. With Godshill Parish joining the Partnership it is hoped that they will also wish to get involved.

I must admit to being somewhat saddened that Godshill Parish doesn’t wish to join with the Ventnor group of parishes; as, indeed, +Norman was when I discussed it with him because, if this decision is ratified, it will have some, perhaps unforeseen, negative consequences for us.

Firstly, the provision of Messy Church in Upper Ventnor will be affected. This venture has up to now been run by St Alban’s and the Ventnor churches as part of their joint missional outreach. However, if Godshill parish are in a group with the Bay churches, we will obviously no longer be an integral part of the missional activity in Ventnor and this relationship will sadly have to come to an end.

Secondly, Ventnor and the surrounding churches, as described above, will be served by Hugh Wright, with Tony Lawrence (currently training at St Stephen’s House) as his curate from the summer, plus Fr Gregory Clifton-Smith and some readers.

Tony, who used to be Churchwarden at St Saviour’s, is a traditionalist Anglo-Catholic; and it had been my hope that as part of his curacy he might, once he has been priested, be able to help at All Saints’ and St Alban’s during our vacancy. However, with the Parish’s decision that they do not want to be part of Ventnor, this will not now be a possibility.

Thirdly, Fr Gregory, who lives in Ventnor and is a member of Hugh’s Team, had been generously giving us one Sunday a month. With the new grouping of the Ventnor area churches, he will necessarily have more calls on his time from those churches. In light of this, it will remain to be seen whether he will be able to continue to support All Saint’s and St Alban’s liturgically.

However, James Cook holds the list of retired clergy who are willing to conduct worship for the many churches currently in vacancy. I know he will help as much as possible in finding priests who can say mass for us although, unfortunately, they are unlikely to be from the Catholic Tradition.

If you are happy with the decision about being in the Bay Partnership, no further action neds to be taken. However, if you wish to deviate from the current position which has been requested, please liaise with your Deanery rep, Alan Philpott, who can then gather a parish outlook and inform Amanda ahead of Synod on Feb 16th.

It was good to speak to +Norman during the week. He sends his love and said he was disappointed that his proposed trip for the weekend of 19th – 21st had had to be cancelled due to the lockdown. He said he hopes to be able to come to the island before too long.

With my love and prayers,

Deacon Corinne

Scripture Readings

6th-Sunday-in-Ordinary-Time-Readings

(Download the Scripture Readings)

Reflection

6th-Sunday-in-Ordinary-Time-Reflection

(Download the Reflection)

The pen/brush and ink above is Christus geneest een melaatse (Christ heals a leper) by Rembrandt circa 1650-1655 and can be seen in the Rijksmuseum, Amsterdam Creative Commons CC0 License

5th Sunday in Ordinary Time

Dear friends,

With the sad news of the death of Captain Sir Tom Moore last week, who inspired the nation and helped us through the tough days of the last year, it is worth taking a moment to consider his optimism and resilience.

Too often these days, we are inclined to forget the wisdom and life experience of older people. Yet those who, like Captain Tom, lived through the war and other challenging times in our nation, learned lessons for life which we could all do well to learn from and to adopt.

There’s a joke which goes, “If you can keep your head when all around you are losing theirs, you obviously don’t appreciate the seriousness of the situation!” Captain Tom’s optimism wasn’t a denial, though, of the realities of the situation we were facing with Covid, nor was it an escape from them. Rather, it was that he stepped up to the challenge, and set us an example of all that is best in humanity.

His simple action, in walking up and down his garden, with absolute focus and resolve, to raise money for the NHS, was an example to us all. His characteristics of stoicism, enthusiasm, warmth, kindness and humour shone through every interview he gave, and offered us light at a very dark time.

I suggest that, as we remember Captain Tom, let us resolve to use what he taught us to live our lives with the same integrity of purpose and love.

Other news: Clergy Chapter will be meeting on Tuesday 9th to discuss the Deanery Plan, before it goes to Deanery Synod the following week. Please pray for all involved in the difficult decision-making process, as we seek to find a way through the challenges currently facing the churches in the Diocese and, especially on the island.

I hope many of you by now will have had your first vaccination. I am delighted to say that serving clergy were invited to go to St Mary’s last week to receive theirs, so I have now been Pfizered!

As more and more people receive vaccinations, we will start to see a way out of lockdown, and I hope and pray it won’t be too long before we can get back to public worship again.

In the meantime, please be assured of my love and prayers. Please give me a ring if you’d like a chat.

Deacon Corinne

Scripture Readings

5th-Sunday-in-Ordinary-Time-Readings

(Download the Scripture Readings)

Reflection

5th-Sunday-in-Ordinary-Time-Reflection

(Download the Reflection)

The pen and wash above is Heilung der Schwiegermutter des Petrus (Christ Healing Peter’s Mother-in-Law) by Rembrandt circa 1650-1660 and can be seen in the Fondation Custodia, an art museum in the 7th arrondissement of Paris Creative Commons CC0 License

4th Sunday in Ordinary Time

Dear friends,

With the grim milestone of over 100,000 deaths to date having been reached last week, it is good to see that the numbers of infections and deaths on the island are slowly beginning to come down.

It is also very encouraging to hear how many of you have now received your first vaccination!

Sadly, we cannot open our churches for public worship yet, but I wanted to draw your attention to an important festival of the Church which is coming up on Tuesday, namely Candlemas; also known as The Presentation of Christ in the temple, or the Purification of the Blessed Virgin Mary.

Candlemas marks the end of 40 days since we celebrated Christ’s birth at Christmas, and the three titles given to this day give us a clue to the three things which are being remembered on this day.

Firstly, the recollection of the prophecy of Simeon in the Temple that the infant Jesus would be “a light for revelation to the Gentiles, and for glory to the people Israel”; the Jewish rites surrounding childbirth for women, and the offering of a first-born Jewish child to God for His service.

Candlemas provides us with a sort of “hinge”, between the birth of Jesus at Christmas and our starting to look towards the cross; and the liturgical colour changes after the Eucharist at Candlemas from the white of Epiphanytide to a more penitential colour as Lent approaches.

Normally, we would have had a mass, with a candle-lit procession, as we remember that we were once presented at church for our baptism. At our baptism we were dedicated to God, and given the name, “Christian.” We received a lit candle from the paschal candle, at which the priest said, “God has delivered us from the dominion of darkness and has given us a place with the saints in light. You have received the light of Christ; walk in this light all the days of your life.

Although we cannot be together to celebrate this Feast, let us spend some time on Feb 2nd pondering our own baptism and what it means to us in our daily discipleship and how we carry out this instruction to “walk in the light of Christ”.

Feb 2nd will also see the funeral of Eileen Jones, who used to be a faithful member of All Saints. Her coffin will be received into church at 4.30pm on Monday Feb 1st and will remain in church overnight. It will leave church at 11.00 on Tuesday Feb 2nd.

Her funeral will be at the crematorium at 12.00, but it will be immediate family and close friends only. However, we hope to have a memorial requiem and the interment of her ashes in due course. If you would like to attend the reception of her coffin, or to be there when she leaves church, you would be very welcome.

My love and prayers,

Deacon Corinne

Scripture Readings

4th-Sunday-in-Ordinary-Time-Readings

(Download the Scripture Readings)

Reflection

4th-Sunday-in-Ordinary-Time-Reflection

(Download the Reflection)

The image above is of a Romanesque fresco in the former bell house of Lambach Abbey. Christ heals a man possessed in the synagogue of Capernaum. Two groups of men are looking at what is happening, the twelve people on the left are probably the twelve apostles. It dates to the 11th century Creative Commons CC0 License